The Importance of Emotional Intelligence for Team Building

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CAREERS
Image: careersthebook.com

Josh Gibson earned his BA from Cornell University and his MD from Columbia University. Now serving as an executive coach and business consultant in San Francisco, Josh Gibson assists clients in integrating emotional intelligence into successful team building.

“Emotional intelligence” is a term developed by researchers John Mayer and Peter Salovey that is defined as a capacity for understanding and handling emotions in yourself and in others. Emotional intelligence plays an important role in teams because interactions between people in teams often rouse emotions.

Emotional intelligence can greatly enhance team efforts due to an increase in trust and motivation. Evaluating team strengths through personality tests and emotional intelligence assessments plays an important part in building a team.

Good teamwork requires a strong team leader who can act as a facilitator and keep everyone engaged. The more aware that leaders become of their own strengths and the strengths of their individual team members, the more they can use these traits to work toward a common goal.

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Self Awareness and Achieving Proper Work-Life Balance

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CAREERS
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Josh Gibson has a background as an MD and guides a San Francisco consulting practice that helps integrate emotional data in creating dynamic, high-functioning workplace teams. Josh Gibson also has experience enabling individuals to achieve fulfillment through a positive work and life balance.

As reported in Fast Company, finding this balance eludes many, with a 2015 study in American Sociological Review revealing that more than 70 percent of US workers struggle to achieve work-life balance. This is particularly true in the contemporary professional environment, in which digital devices have made people accessible to employers and coworkers nearly 24 hours a day.

One aspect of developing work-life balance involves fostering habits of conscious choice, rather than letting things go until there are no other options. This involves continuously assessing situations and making changes as required.

At the same time, success should not be defined by others but rather by one’s own terms. By maintaining a strong sense of individuality, and accurately assessing personal skills and potential, it is possible to avoid situations that overwhelm and prevent progress from being made.

Keep in mind that it can be difficult to assess work-life balance from the outside, as each person has his or her own internal way of functioning. While different individuals’ actions may seem skewed to one extreme or another, if these people are consistently productive and content, that may simply be the balance that works best for them.

Improving Americans Work-Life Balance

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CAREERS
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A former MD, Josh Gibson served on the clinical team of Quartet Health where he developed relationships with health care providers to drive adoption of Quartet’s collaborative care platform. An executive coach and consultant, Josh Gibson assists individuals to find a healthy work-life balance.

Americans are doing poorly balancing their professional work and their personal lives, according to a report by Family Living Today and Now Sourcing. In the report, the United States is ranked 30th out of 38 countries with a positive work-life balance.

Researchers found that 11.4 percent of employees in the country worked 50 plus hours a week, with 33 percent reporting to work on weekends or on holidays. Overall, 66 percent of full-time employees believed they had no work-life balance. Many attributed this to demanding bosses, excess work, rigid schedules, long commutes, and difficult colleagues.

In the long run, a poor work-life balance can cause stress and increase the risk of heart disease, anxiety, and depression. Employers can play a huge role in preventing this problem by offering flexible schedules, allowing remote work, increasing time off, and creating meeting-free time blocks to increase worker productivity. Employees can also improve their own work-life balance by making time for exercise, switching off the phone when away from work, and delegating responsibilities.

An Overview of Occupational Therapy Support

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American Occupational Therapy
Image: aota.org

Josh Gibson, MD has provided clinical psychiatric care to individuals in the San Francisco, California, region for nearly 15 years. A few of his previous positions include associate physician diplomate at the University of California, San Francisco, and consulting psychiatrist with Walden House. Josh Gibson, MD practices in various areas of psychiatry, including occupational therapy.

The primary role of an occupational therapist is to assist individuals of all ages in successfully completing important daily activities, such as school work or job duties. Though some individuals associate occupational therapy with helping adults deal with injuries and cognitive changes, children living with disabilities may also benefit from therapeutic support when it comes to education and social interactions.

Occupational therapy services generally begin with an evaluation of the individual, over the course of which clients and family members can work with a therapist on establishing goals and ways to achieve these goals. These evaluations may involve visits to a client’s place of work, home, and other relevant environments. As therapeutic intervention begins, therapists can set new goals and further refine their therapeutic approach to better suit a client’s needs. More information regarding occupational therapy can be found at the American Occupational Therapy (AOTA) website, www.aota.org.

CAREERS – Tips for Achieving Professional Fulfillment

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CAREERS
Image: careersthebook.com

An assistant clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, Josh Gibson, MD, also operates a private practice in San Francisco, where he focuses on clinical and occupational psychiatry. Josh Gibson, MD, has given a number of presentations at professional gatherings over the years and helped pen the e-book CAREERS – A Brainwise Guide to Finding Fulfillment at Work.

Published in 2012, CAREERS explores the concept of being happy in one’s profession and finding an appropriate work-life balance. The book addresses two questions: what will you do for a career, and how will you get to that desired point? The authors offer advice from professionals who have already achieved satisfying careers and couple the advice with relevant scientific findings from psychology and neurology.

The authors distill their knowledge into seven chapters, and in each they discuss a specific positive behavior that reflects elements of essential brain function. Beginning with a chapter on change and ending with one on sacrifice, the book is designed to guide readers through the process of finding sustainable fulfillment in their professional and personal lives.

CAREERS – A Brainwise Guide to Fulfillment at Work

CAREERS pic

CAREERS
Image: careersthebook.com

Josh Gibson, MD, has worked as a psychiatrist in the San Francisco area of California’s East Bay for nearly 15 years. When he is not providing clinical care in areas of psychotherapy and medication management, Josh Gibson, MD, engages in a variety of professional projects and initiatives. During his time with the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, he led the group that authored CAREERS.

CAREERS: A Brainwise Guide to Fulfillment at Work is a book that provides readers with a platform for considering different career paths. Placing an emphasis on the ideal yet elusive balance between professional success and personal fulfillment, the book includes extensive conversations with successful individuals who have found satisfaction in both areas.

These discussions are enhanced by the latest research in areas of psychology and neuroscience. The result is a comprehensive but readable breakdown of the seven core behaviors that allow individuals to not just survive their professional lives, but thrive in them. These areas of behavior include the tendencies to change, risk, reflect, endure, and explore. To learn more about these seven behavioral traits or the science behind CAREERS, please visit www.careersthebook.com.

Making Early Career Decisions that Emphasize Personal Growth

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CAREERS
Image: careersthebook.com

Josh Gibson, MD, is a seasoned San Francisco Bay Area psychiatrist who maintains a private practice and offers patient-focused psychotherapy and medication management. He is author of the 2013 book CAREERS – A Brainwise Guide to Finding Fulfillment at Work. In it, Josh Gibson, MD, examines seven core behaviors from exploration to endurance that can boost career satisfaction and amplify psychological and emotional health.

Dr. Gibson posits that the most effective way of envisioning employment among new college graduates involves positioning the job as part of a wider self-growth plan. This concept is reflected in a National Association of Colleges and Employers survey from 2012 that indicates personal fulfillment to be a primary aim for new job seekers.

The key to such fulfillment, according to this theory, involves integrating life-work goals with a proper balance of behaviors such as risk-taking, change, and sacrifice. The appropriate level of risk to take on varies widely between individuals, depending on their psychological makeup and ultimate life goals. Effective career decision-making then requires careful reflection on one’s risk tolerance before setting on a specific path.